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Vox Populus

The Latin words vox populus mean “voice of the people.” Journalists use this phrase to describe a type of storytelling that asks people on the street their opinions about important topics. With this in mind, Point Park University students talked with people in Downtown about some of the biggest stories of the day.

COVID-19 pandemic

By Nathan Cardillo

Jacob Dulya, 18, From Duquesne University

Q: What are your opinions on the COVID-19 Vaccine?

A: “I trust it. I think it is safe. I think it works I think there’s a reason that it’s FDA approved, there’s a reason that, you know, people are getting it and there’s a reason that it saving lives.”

Q: Do you still wear a mask in public spaces where it is optional?

A: “No, but if you know it’s required, I’m not going to be upset about it. It’s their rules I’m going to follow it for a reason. But most of the time where it’s optional, I feel like it makes sense, whether or not I need one.”

Q: What do you think of the COVID-19 guidelines in your workplace or campus?

A: “They’re definitely more strict than anything else because you still need to be very careful. … It’s nothing I’m against considering the concentration of kids”.

By Delta Daley

Michael Cerilli (Photo by Constantine, Concetta)

Q: What is your name, age, occupation, and where are you from?

A: “My name is Michael Cirelli, I am 32 years old, I am from Ellwood City, and I

sell mushrooms.”

Q: What are your opinions on the COVID-19 Vaccines?

A: “I think everyone should get it, it’s the only chance we have of not having Covid be an every-year occurrence.”

Q: Do you still wear masks in an indoor public setting? Why or why not?

A: “Yes, because we can still transmit the virus whether we’re vaccinated or not.”

Q: What do you think of the Covid-19 guidelines in your workplace or other public

spaces? Do they make you feel safe or is it overkill?

A: “The guidelines make me feel safe. It’s a little bit of an annoyance, but it’s a

necessary annoyance, although I would say not enough places are actually

still upholding the guidelines and I think they should.”

By Grant Clarke

Andrew Pharrell, of the Cultural District

Q: What is your opinion on the COVID-19 vaccine?

A: “I’ve already been vaccinated; I’m just waiting to see when I should get a booster. So, I don’t

really have any concerns with the vaccine. I mean it’s like anything else, you get vaccinated to go to school, things like that.

Q: Do you still wear a mask inside in public, regardless of being vaccinated?

A: When I’m in the grocery store, and stuff like that. If I’m outside I usually don’t wear it.”

Q: What do you think of the COVID-19 guidelines in your workplace, and do they make you feel safe or not?

A: “We’re working, like, remotely, so I’m fine with that.”

By Bethany Latham

Savannah Moon, a 29-year-old Pittsburgh native who co-owns Hello Hummus.

Q: What are your opinions on the COVID-19 Vaccines?

A: Savannah thinks the COVID-19 Vaccines are a “necessary thing. I am fully vaccinated and I don’t want to push my opinion on anyone else, but I think that science is real and vaccines are created for a reason.”

Q: Do you still wear a mask inside in public, why or why not?

A: “I haven’t yet but I probably will soon because I know immunocompromised people.”

Q: What do you think of the Covid-19 guidelines in your workplace? Do they make you feel safe or is it overkill?

A: “I don’t think it’s overkill at all. I think that professionals know more about vaccines and COVID in general – more than the general public. Listening to them shouldn’t be a negative thing. I think that COVID has turned into a huge political battle. I don’t think it’s a political thing at all; it’s just like getting a flu shot or any other vaccine. I think it’s a positive thing and guidelines and rules are in place for a reason.”

 

U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan

By Anthony Cugini

Kevin Sidlinge, 68, of Mt. Washington

Q: How do you feel about the president’s decision to withdraw US troops from Afghanistan?

A: “His decision was good. His execution was amateurish and pathetic.”

Q: How do you feel about the tactic of missile strikes in response to the bombing at Abul airport?

A: “It should’ve been done more. Should’ve been done multiple more times.”

By Sean Mazza

Charles Powell, 18, of Penn Hills

Q: So, what is your opinion on the withdrawal from Afghanistan and Biden’s handling of the situation?

A: “Well, I don’t think it was a bad decision, but then again this is an arms race. In respect to showing power, it makes the United states seem a bit weaker compared to other countries. However, there wasn’t a lot of time left there so even if it made us seem weaker, I feel it was a good decision.”

Q: “And how do you feel about the US’s Missile retaliation against the Kabul airport bombing?’

A: “They had already attacked citizens, so I feel it was not a bad decision to do that. However, I feel like it was kind of reckless because you don’t know what kind of people or citizens could have been there to receive our retaliation. I feel it wasn’t the best interest to do that.”

 

Pittsburgh Steelers expectations

By Cassidy Concanon

Carolyn Gill, 59, of Beechview

Q: Do you think the team will be able to make the playoffs this year, what will help them

get there?

A: “I absolutely think the Steelers can make the playoffs this year. With the power of

the city and the community behind them they will be able to make it there.”

Q: There have been two fights within the team just during the preseason; how do you think

this will affect the team during the season?

A: “Fights happen; it’s not the first time it’s happened. I have faith that they will come

together as a team and do what they need to do.”

By Brandon Kurzawski

Tyron Jackson, 35, of the North Side

Q: Do you think the team will be able to make the playoffs this year, what will help them

get there?

A: “Yes, they still have Big Ben there.”

Q: There have been two fights within the team just during the preseason; how do you think

this will affect the team during the season?

A: “I hope not. The coaches will get on them, and nobody wants to lose money.”

 

Kanye West’s new album, Donda

By Tyler A. Krajacic

Mark Sotomayor, 23, of Providence, Rhode Island. He works as the CEO – or as Sotomayor likes to say, “TEO” – of Treecuptea in Evans City, Pa.

Q: What comes to mind when you hear the name, “Donda”?

A: “The Spanish word, ‘Donde.’ I’m fully Peruvian.”

Q: There’s an album that Kanye West released recently called, “Donda”. Did you listen to it?

A: “I follow Kanye West, but I wasn’t aware he released a new album.”

Q: What are your thoughts on Kanye West?

A: “I think God has a plan for him. There’s more to him than most people think.”

By Riley Sanguigni

Maxwell Goode, 18, of Williamsport, Pa.

Q: What comes to mind when you hear the name, “Donda”?

A: “I think of Kanye West’s album”

Q: There’s an album that Kanye West released recently called, “Donda”. Did you listen to it?

A: “At first, I was like it was alright but once I started listening to it again, I was

enjoying it more”

Q: How do you feel about Kanye’s recent antics, including his listening parties?

A: “It was so dumb. Why three listening parties but not dropping the album

right there. He should have just done one listening party. Everyone knows

the songs already even if you change the songs”

By Garrett Susko

Rob Jonne, of Bethel Park

Q: What comes to your mind when you hear the name “Donda”?

A: “I have not heard of Donda.”

Q: Have you heard of Kanye West?

A: “I do like some of Kanye West’s music.”

Q: Donda is Kanye’s new album. Do you plan on listening to it?

A: “I’ll probably listen to it when I get the chance.”

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